Volunteers Lead Cemetery Preservation Projects

November 18, 2020

Beyond Static Land

Woven into the soil of Warner Parks are not only the roots of forest and flower, but also the legacy of the families who lived here long ago. There are a total of 10 identified cemeteries throughout the Parks, and while we delicately promote their locations and visibility to the general public, their preservation is of the utmost importance.

Warner Park Nature Center Naturalists and Friends of Warner Parks have a long history of maintaining the honored grounds – it was founding FOWP board member John Hardcastle who initiated his “Beyond Static Lands” cemetery programs in the 1980’s, and it is in homage to Mr. Hardcastle that we title this article and highlight some of the volunteer-led initiatives that have recently been taken to preserve, steward, and protect these special places.  

Northern Cemetery

You just might miss this site if you aren’t looking for it, but now it has a sign! Located within the walls of the Harpeth Hills Golf Course, the Northern Cemetery now boasts a fence and instructive sign thanks to the initiatives of a local Eagle Scout. So too does the site receive regular TLC thanks to an Adopt-A-Park volunteer who shows up routinely to mow and blow the area.

DeMoss cemetery and home site

The DeMoss cemetery and homesite has also been recently adopted, this one by a group of local 8th graders. They’ve cleared the grounds of invasive species and cleared the way for native trees, shrubs and flowers to rise once more from the forest floor -teaching one another how to make wreaths out of honeysuckle along the way! #InvasiveFreeWP #ProtectWarnerParks

Richards Cemetery

Particularly exciting news pertains to the Richards Cemetery located in the Burch Reserve off of Highway 100. Working with another Eagle Scout who wanted to focus his efforts on cemetery preservation, Cammie Claybrook has overseen the clearing of the alleged cemetery. A sign was recently installed which you will now see along the Burch Reserve trail, but the preservation efforts won’t end there. One of our WPNC grad students recently came across the Last Will and Testament of Elizabeth Richards on an investigative quest, and we dive into this document in search of guidance as to how to family wished the cemetery to look.

It is our mission to ensure the Parks are here for all, forever – in all it’s facets. The living legacies, and those that have been laid to rest. We take this opportunity to honor the families who were here before us, and the friends who stand with us today in our efforts to preserve, steward, and protect Warner Parks.

Learn more about our efforts to be #InvasiveFreeWP - a top priority of our It's My Nature Campaign - and how you can come to adopt your own part of the Parks through our Adopt-A-Park program.

Virtual Field Trips Library

Volunteers Lead Cemetery Preservation Projects

November 18, 2020

Beyond Static Land

Woven into the soil of Warner Parks are not only the roots of forest and flower, but also the legacy of the families who lived here long ago. There are a total of 10 identified cemeteries throughout the Parks, and while we delicately promote their locations and visibility to the general public, their preservation is of the utmost importance.

Warner Park Nature Center Naturalists and Friends of Warner Parks have a long history of maintaining the honored grounds – it was founding FOWP board member John Hardcastle who initiated his “Beyond Static Lands” cemetery programs in the 1980’s, and it is in homage to Mr. Hardcastle that we title this article and highlight some of the volunteer-led initiatives that have recently been taken to preserve, steward, and protect these special places.  

Northern Cemetery

You just might miss this site if you aren’t looking for it, but now it has a sign! Located within the walls of the Harpeth Hills Golf Course, the Northern Cemetery now boasts a fence and instructive sign thanks to the initiatives of a local Eagle Scout. So too does the site receive regular TLC thanks to an Adopt-A-Park volunteer who shows up routinely to mow and blow the area.

DeMoss cemetery and home site

The DeMoss cemetery and homesite has also been recently adopted, this one by a group of local 8th graders. They’ve cleared the grounds of invasive species and cleared the way for native trees, shrubs and flowers to rise once more from the forest floor -teaching one another how to make wreaths out of honeysuckle along the way! #InvasiveFreeWP #ProtectWarnerParks

Richards Cemetery

Particularly exciting news pertains to the Richards Cemetery located in the Burch Reserve off of Highway 100. Working with another Eagle Scout who wanted to focus his efforts on cemetery preservation, Cammie Claybrook has overseen the clearing of the alleged cemetery. A sign was recently installed which you will now see along the Burch Reserve trail, but the preservation efforts won’t end there. One of our WPNC grad students recently came across the Last Will and Testament of Elizabeth Richards on an investigative quest, and we dive into this document in search of guidance as to how to family wished the cemetery to look.

It is our mission to ensure the Parks are here for all, forever – in all it’s facets. The living legacies, and those that have been laid to rest. We take this opportunity to honor the families who were here before us, and the friends who stand with us today in our efforts to preserve, steward, and protect Warner Parks.

Learn more about our efforts to be #InvasiveFreeWP - a top priority of our It's My Nature Campaign - and how you can come to adopt your own part of the Parks through our Adopt-A-Park program.

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