New Chimney Swift Tower

March 22, 2021

Chimney Swift Tower

Have you noticed this beautiful new structure at Warner Park Nature Center? It is a Chimney Swift tower… but what is that?

What are Chimney Swifts?

Chimney Swifts are small, fast-flying native birds that catch their food (insects like beetles, mayflies, and wasps) on the wing. Swifts are closely related to hummingbirds and similarly are considered Neotropical migrants – meaning they breed here in North America and winter in South America. Chimney Swift populations have declined significantly and are considered a species of concern

Why do they need a tower?

This tower is basically a giant bird house for our native Chimney Swifts. Before European settlers, these birds nested in the hollow trees of old-growth forests. Like Purple Martins and Barn Swallows who now rely on human structures for nesting, Chimney Swifts adapted to use chimneys for their nesting cavities. This beautiful Chimney Swift Tower will provide much needed nesting habitat & perhaps a roosting site for swifts before they make their long journey south for the winter.   

 Thank you Jack!

Eagle Scout Jack Sudderth understood the need to provide habitat to this declining bird species, and wove it into his service project.

"I knew I wanted to have a project that benefited Warner Parks, and when this was presented to me as an option, I loved the idea immediately". Jack not only raised the funds but also designed and oversaw the construction of the tower. “My favorite part was when we had our first official workday, we had many scouts and their parents come out to support me. I really felt supported by such a great group of people" said Jack. 

5 Ways YOU can do to help declining bird populations!

Observe:  This spring, listen for the chattering of the Chimney Swifts returning to our area after a 3000-mile journey from the upper Amazon basin. Report your observations on eBird

Dig deeper: Learn more about Chimney Swifts - how to identify them, their vocalizations, and behaviors.

Build a tower: Jack did his research and he says the book Chimney Swift Towers: New Habitat for America's Mysterious Birds by Paul and Goergean Kyle is a great resource. He used it to design & build this tower. 

At home: Check out 7 tips to helping our birds.

Support FOWP: The BIRD Program is funded by Friends of Warner Parks, in collaboration with Warner Park Nature Center and Nashville Metro Parks and Recreation. This year marks the 40th year of the WPNC Bird Banding Station thanks to our dedicated volunteers, staff, and partners!  Please support our legacy bird research and public engagement programs with a donation, becoming a member, and volunteering with Warner Parks. #ProtectTheBirds #ProtectWarnerParks. 

New Chimney Swift Tower

March 22, 2021

Chimney Swift Tower

Have you noticed this beautiful new structure at Warner Park Nature Center? It is a Chimney Swift tower… but what is that?

What are Chimney Swifts?

Chimney Swifts are small, fast-flying native birds that catch their food (insects like beetles, mayflies, and wasps) on the wing. Swifts are closely related to hummingbirds and similarly are considered Neotropical migrants – meaning they breed here in North America and winter in South America. Chimney Swift populations have declined significantly and are considered a species of concern

Why do they need a tower?

This tower is basically a giant bird house for our native Chimney Swifts. Before European settlers, these birds nested in the hollow trees of old-growth forests. Like Purple Martins and Barn Swallows who now rely on human structures for nesting, Chimney Swifts adapted to use chimneys for their nesting cavities. This beautiful Chimney Swift Tower will provide much needed nesting habitat & perhaps a roosting site for swifts before they make their long journey south for the winter.   

 Thank you Jack!

Eagle Scout Jack Sudderth understood the need to provide habitat to this declining bird species, and wove it into his service project.

"I knew I wanted to have a project that benefited Warner Parks, and when this was presented to me as an option, I loved the idea immediately". Jack not only raised the funds but also designed and oversaw the construction of the tower. “My favorite part was when we had our first official workday, we had many scouts and their parents come out to support me. I really felt supported by such a great group of people" said Jack. 

5 Ways YOU can do to help declining bird populations!

Observe:  This spring, listen for the chattering of the Chimney Swifts returning to our area after a 3000-mile journey from the upper Amazon basin. Report your observations on eBird

Dig deeper: Learn more about Chimney Swifts - how to identify them, their vocalizations, and behaviors.

Build a tower: Jack did his research and he says the book Chimney Swift Towers: New Habitat for America's Mysterious Birds by Paul and Goergean Kyle is a great resource. He used it to design & build this tower. 

At home: Check out 7 tips to helping our birds.

Support FOWP: The BIRD Program is funded by Friends of Warner Parks, in collaboration with Warner Park Nature Center and Nashville Metro Parks and Recreation. This year marks the 40th year of the WPNC Bird Banding Station thanks to our dedicated volunteers, staff, and partners!  Please support our legacy bird research and public engagement programs with a donation, becoming a member, and volunteering with Warner Parks. #ProtectTheBirds #ProtectWarnerParks. 

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